Robotic Vacuums

Review Dibea D960 Robot Vacuum Cleaner Smart Self-Charging Robot with Precise Edge Cleaning Technology

Judy D. Evans
Written by Judy D. Evans

The Dibea D960 is marketed as a competitor to a range of robotic vacuums currently flooding the market, and on paper at least, includes some pretty tempting features. It’s battery-powered, programmable, and includes a remote control. It is not Wi-Fi or smart phone compatible. Perhaps its biggest claim to fame is a 2 hour (120 minute) runtime from its Li-on battery pack. The battery takes around 3 hours to charge. The D960 has a 350 ml-sized dust bin, up to 1,200pa of suction, and a 12 inch cleaning radius. It weighs 6.6 pounds on our scale and also includes H11-grade HEPA filtration.

Rather than the traditional O or round shape for robotic vacuums, the Dibea uses the D-shape popularized by Neato (e.g., in the Botvac Connected). Dibea also describes the D960 as very quiet due to its motor design. Dibea D960 vacuuming robot provides a quick and thorough cleanup, all at the push of a button. The equipped advanced brushless motor and 1200pa powerful suction allow D960 to pick up more dust and pet hair, and with lower vacuuming noise at the same time. It cleans from room to room, moves from hard floors to thin carpets, goes over thresholds and avoids stairs. 3 inch tall, is specifically designed to fit under most furniture and tackle small messes.

Product Features:
While the D960 has a number of impressive features on paper–most notably the battery life–nothing matters if it doesn’t actually deliver in practice. The verdict is mixed. Let’s look at the good news first.
When it came to navigation, we were pleased with the level of intelligence programmed into the D960. While it definitely wasn’t the smartest robotic vacuum we’ve come across (that award would go to the Roomba 980 and 960), when it came to finding its way across a room, it did so without repeating itself more than the typical machine we’ve reviewed in its price range. True to Dibea’s word, when done cleaning or when low on battery, the D960 would return faithfully to its charging base to recharge or pat itself for a job well done.
In terms of cleaning, it was comfortable on hardwood floors and low-pile carpets and rugs. The D960, like every robotic vacuum we’ve tested besides the Botvac Connected, was no match for higher pile carpets.

What’s in the box?
Inside the box, you’ll find the D960 itself with its battery pre-installed and partially charged, a charging base and adapter, a remote, and extra side and cleaning brushes as well as a HEPA filter. You’ll also find a user’s guide and the same too-short one year manufacturing warranty that every robotic vacuum cleaner appears to have copied nearly word for word from every other on the market. Yes, this is a pet peeve of ours, although we can’t blame Dibea for sticking to the same low standards everyone else is right now. Inside the box, you’ll find the D960 itself with its battery pre-installed and partially charged, a charging base and adapter, a remote, and extra side and cleaning brushes as well as a HEPA filter. You’ll also find a user’s guide and the same too-short one year manufacturing warranty that every robotic vacuum cleaner appears to have copied nearly word for word from every other on the market. Yes, this is a pet peeve of ours, although we can’t blame Dibea for sticking to the same low standards everyone else is right now.

Pros
• Quiet operation is great if you have very young children at home
• Great for hard floors and low pile carpet
• Decent sized bin
• Larger water tank can cover a lot of ground
• Low profile design will fit under a lot of furniture
• Has HEPA filtration
• This second generation Dibea robot is much more refined in terms of finish and functionality except for the navigation.

Cons
• It will not deep clean carpet
• Not as efficient as the D900 in terms of navigation but it is thorough

Final Conclusion:
In conclusion, the Dibea D960 is perhaps a cautionary tale about the perils of trying to save too much money–whether for the people who buy it in hopes of saving money over a more established vacuum like the Roomba 690 or for the people who designed it and obtained stellar results in the lab that didn’t quite translate into daily use. It’s not a bad vacuum by any means; we’re just not sure it’s worth buying over a number of other vacuums from manufacturers with longer, more painfully won reputations. There appear to be plenty of happy people with the D960, and it’s possible time will prove it to be an excellent vacuum. However, if you’re more risk adverse, we’d recommend the Deebot N79 or Roomba 690 instead if looking for a sub-$300 robotic vacuum that’ll almost certainly keep working long after your one year warranty is up.

Youtube link:

 

About the author

Judy D. Evans

Judy D. Evans

Spent 2001-2005 developing strategies for cleaning company formation in Tampa, FL. Spent college summers lecturing about marketing with no outside help. Spent childhood building my own cleaning company in Pensacola, FL.

Leave a Comment